blue footed boobies

The Galápagos Islands - travelling through the archives

With no big bucket-list travel plans on the horizon, I thought I might spelunk my archives and relive some old adventures. Here's hoping we all get to explore further fields again some day! This story is inspired by this week's Art of Birding photo challenge, which is "one from the archives." It's all about the time we visited the Galápagos Islands - a huge, wonderful and scary adventure we undertook in 2014. I'd not travelled for years and never intrepidly - this was well out of my comfort zone! It took much arm-twisting and encouragement from the lovely Lynn. But I'm so glad I took the plunge, not least of all because it sparked a love of wildlife photography. Because it was a photography trip, that was the impetus to buy my first decent camera (ironically most people on the trip were not photographers). It was a pivotal trip in my first steps towards becoming an artist, although I didn't know it at the time. Thanks Lynn and thanks Tui for a trip of a lifetime!

blue footed boobies
Blue-footed boobies

Lynn also twisted the arms of other Zealandia-associated people, making for a lovely, friendly group of people to travel with, along with a few brave souls from other parts of the world who found themselves surrounded by kiwi bird-nerds. Leaving from Ecuador, we flew to the islands and set sail on a little boat for an 11 day cruise. We each chose a “spirit animal” that we most wanted to see. I chose the Blue-footed Booby – a most ridiculous and improbable bird with bright blue feet and intricate courtship rituals, which involves showing off said feet and offering sticks to their beloved.

Tui de Roy photographing a sealion
Tui de Roy photographing a baby sea lion

Sea lion
A baby sea lion posing in the golden morning light on Mosquera Island

We learned so much from the amazing Tui de Roy - the wildlife photographer leading the tour - and a Galápagos native. My biggest take-home was to get on-level with my critter and not take “roadkill” shots looking down on them. That sometimes involves getting down in the sand and dirt, but we were also fortunate to get great angles on albatross that were launching themselves off a cliff face.

waved albatross in flight
A close-up of a waved albatross in flight at Punta Suarez

Landings on the islands are strictly controlled and timed. Because we were a photography tour, we got the early morning and late afternoon slots, which made for fabulous light (though some very early starts!).

waved albatross courtship
Waved albatross courtship ritual

The hardest outing, but the most rewarding, was getting out to the waved albatross colony, which involved walking a couple of km over pebbly rocks - exhausting! The albatross are amazing, and so beautiful with their delicate patterning and big eyes. We got to see their courtship rituals where they mimic each other in a choreographed dance, usually with a competitor looking on. My favourite shot from the entire trip is the one above.

Flamingo
A flamingo!

I was blown away to see flamingos up close, peacefully feeding in the shallows. Such stunning birds. They're not endemic to the islands, but it was the first time I'd ever seen one.

​Getting up close was a theme of the trip. Most of the birds evolved without seeing humans as a threat. We were able to walk through their breeding colonies and if we kept quietly to ourselves, they simply didn't give a shit that we were there. There was no need for a super long lens or tripod on this trip! Most of these photos were taken with a 35-100mm or 100-300mm zoom (4/3rds camera).

nesting magnificent frigatebird and chick
A Magnificent Frigatebird and her muppet baby

Great frigatebird with throat enlarged
A male Great Frigatebird proclaiming his love by blowing up his air sac into a heart-shaped balloon.

Magnificent frigatebirds throats empty
Male Magnificent Frigatebirds with deflated air sacs, hanging from their necks like old wrinkly testicles.

The Galápagos are filled with improbable critters, and the stories of their evolution are fascinating. Possibly the most improbable though is the Galápagos penguin - yes a penguin - found in the tropics at the equator! Curiously, the waters around the islands are cold due to the Humboldt current, which brings cold water up from southern Chile. This photo is a wee bit blurry because the zodiac was pitching up and down.

Penguin
A tropical penguin! One of the few Spanish words I learned was "El penguino", which came in handy

Another improbable bird was the short-eared owl that lives in cavities out on the volcanic flats - this was Lynn's spirit bird. We only spotted one once it started flapping its wings frantically.

woman using binoculars
Lynn searching for the camouflaged short-eared owl

owl
Success!!

woman photographing bird in sky while sitting on rocks
Volcanic rock is abrasive so kneepads are recommended! (Photo of Judi photographing frigatebirds, by Lynn Freeman)

It's always problematic to take long-haul travel to visit rare and endangered birds, but the Galápagos can only afford to look after these precious ecosystems with the money they get from tourism. It's a delicate balance with no easy answers. If you do get the opportunity to go, do go - there's nothing else like it on earth. But do your research first and choose your tour operator carefully to ensure they put the welfare of the critters first (Lynn did just this, and chose brilliantly!)

tour group on boat
Happy adventurers on the last night of the tour (photo by Tui de Roy)

Next story, I'll show you some amazing birds from the side-trip we took to the Bella Vista Cloud Forest in Ecuador - just as amazing and totally different!

A P.S. about pottying and intrepid travelling...

One thing tour operators are often bad at is telling you how much fitness is needed for a trip and practical things like how long the walks are and how often you'll get a potty break - information I need before committing to a trip. People who have chronic illnesses can manage quite intrepid travelling if fully informed and well prepared. Fortunately the folk at Galapagos Travel were super helpful and allayed all my concerns.

If you're thinking of touring the Galápagos, know there are no loos on most of the islands, so you need to hold on for a couple of hours (most outings were for no longer than that). Most of the islands are covered in scrubby bush, so there's no ducking behind a tree, and even if you don't mind hanging it all out, it's discouraged. I managed by giving up coffee (a diuretic) before the trip, and only having a proper drink once we returned from the morning's outing. I only took judicious sips of water while out walking, just enough to avoid dehydration. I also had an emergency pee/poo/puke bag filled with absorbant crystals that could be used for emergencies, but thankfully never had to use it (pick them up online or from a travel/outdoors store for the peace-of-mind if nothing else).

​Typically there were three things to do each day: a morning excursion, an afternoon snorkel, and a late afternoon/evening excursion. Some of the excursions were just cruising in the zodiacs and some involved getting out and walking. I usually chose just two of the three events a day to manage my energy levels and stayed on the boat otherwise. I didn't miss out on any show-stopper outings, and cleverly avoided climbing the volcano in the mist to not get a view and not get covered in mud 😂. I was converted to small boat cruises as a way to travel - you only unpack the once, and it's easier to skip an outing because you know you're not going to be left behind!

Happy to answer any questions you may have about travelling in the Galápagos in the comments below... 
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8 comments

Great photos and advice. We also did a small boat cruise. Hadn’t heard of the owl but might be on a different Island to the ones we visited. We were treated to close up encounter with Galapagos hawk. Must look back through our photos now!

Gill07 Mar 2021
Thanks Gill! Yes, we also saw the hawk a couple of times too, but those photos didn’t make the cut (I did take rather a lot LOL). Looking at my notes, the owl was on Genovesa (Tower) along from Prince Phillip’s steps and very hard to see! Happy reminiscing – do post some of your pics to FB – I’d love to see them!
Ngā mihi
Judi

Judi08 Mar 2021
stunning photos, Judi. It must have been an extraordinary experience.

Carol07 Mar 2021
Thanks so much Carol – it was an amazing trip! So glad I got up the courage to do it!
Ngā mihi
Judi

Judi08 Mar 2021
I love your favourite photo and also the baby sea lion. Thanks for sharing these and for the travel tips.

Amber07 Mar 2021
So glad you enjoyed them!
Cheers,
Judi

Judi08 Mar 2021
Wow just wow, loved the photos Judi. I’m very proud that you managed your trip well keeping in mind your health and working around it. The images you’ve captured as usual have just gotten better and better. Thank you so much for allowing us to travel with you.

Sam Edmonds07 Mar 2021
Thanks Sam – I’m so glad you enjoyed the tour! And that the travel tips were interesting – I hope they will be helpful for others.
Ngā mihi
Judi

Judi08 Mar 2021

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